Contaminated Site Clean-up Information (clu-in): Internet Seminar Audio Archives

Informações:

Sinopse

Since 1998, The Contaminated Site Clean-Up Information (CLU-IN) website has presented Internet Seminars covering a wide variety of technical topics related to hazardous waste characterization, monitoring, and remediation. For each seminar topic, we have selected the highest-quality offering for placement in our archives. Beginning in May 2005, we began offering these archives via podcast, and this feed contains all seminars archived in the last 6 months. For a complete list of seminars archived since 2000 and videos of selected seminars archived since 2012, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/archive/. Our Rehabilitation Act Notice for reasonable accommodation is available at http://clu-in.org/training/accommodation.cfm. CLU-IN was developed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) but is intended as a forum for all waste remediation stakeholders. For more information and to view upcoming live offerings, please visit http://clu-in.org/live/. For a complete list of RSS feeds available on CLU-IN, please visit http://clu-in.org/rss/about/.

Episódios

  • Audio for "Recognizing the Positive Economic Impacts of Superfund Redevelopment," Feb 7, 2024

    07/02/2024

    Future use remains a key consideration for EPA's cleanup programs. EPA's Superfund program works with property owners, developers, stakeholders and communities to negotiate agreements, address barriers and make sure property uses will fit well with site remedies. In turn, the cleanup and reuse of Superfund sites revitalizes local economies, supporting jobs, new businesses, tax revenue and spending, and provides new amenities for communities affected by site contamination. EPA also works to ensure that existing businesses on properties being cleaned up under Superfund can continue operating in a way that protects human health and the environment, enabling these businesses to remain open and serve as a source of jobs and income for local communities. This webinar showcases the economic benefits of Superfund Redevelopment for communities across the country. Participants will hear about creative strategies used in redevelopment projects in New England and the Mid-Atlantic. They will also learn about collaborativ

  • Audio for "ITRC: Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR)," Feb 6, 2024

    06/02/2024

    The ITRC Managed Aquifer Recharge (MAR-1) Training is intended for state regulators and stakeholders who may not be familiar with the opportunities and challenges associated with MAR. It provides a basic understanding of MAR concepts, along with case studies, that showcase examples of successful MAR applications. For those who are familiar with MAR, the training gives an overview of the components of the MAR process along with the important considerations associated with each component necessary for the design and implementation of a MAR project. It is important to understand that MAR is an area of active research and expanding practical applications, and that this management process is continuing to evolve with time.The combination of climate change and growing demand for fresh water has resulted in an increase in the vulnerability and scarcity of freshwater supplies around the world. The need for fresh water to grow crops and provide for the welfare of the general population, economic growth, and ecosystem

  • Audio for "Correcting Some Misconceptions about EPA's Superfund Approach for Radiation Risk Assessment," Jan 31, 2024

    31/01/2024

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) has primary responsibility for implementing the remedial long-term (non-emergency) portion of a key U.S. law regulating cleanup: the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act, CERCLA, nicknamed "Superfund." The Superfund program generally addresses radioactive contamination in a consistent manner as it addresses chemical contamination, except where there are technical differences between radionuclides and other chemicals. For example, cleanup levels for radioactive contamination at sites are generally expressed in terms of risk levels (e.g., 10-4), rather than millirem or millisieverts, as a unit of measure. Although EPA and other US agencies have issued millirem-based regulations under other statutory authorities, under CERCLA EPA promulgated a risk range of 10-4 to 10-6 as a standard of protectiveness for all carcinogens including radionuclides. CERCLA guidance recomme

  • Audio for "ITRC Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) Identification Framework," Jan 25, 2024

    25/01/2024

    In 2023, the ITRC Contaminants of Emerging Concern (CEC) Framework was published to help environmental regulatory agencies and other stakeholders identify, evaluate, and manage CEC's while acknowledging uncertainties in their environmental fate and transport, receptor exposure, and/or toxicity. Such an approach can be conducive to improved allocation of regulatory response resources and provide a foundation for communicating potential risk to stakeholders. The ITRC framework is comprised of a white paper and four associated fact sheets. In the white paper, CEC are defined as: "substances and microorganisms including physical, chemical, biological, or radiological materials known or anticipated in the environment, that may pose newly identified risks to human health or the environment." The framework is meant to help environmental regulatory agencies and other stakeholders by providing examples of CEC monitoring programs and guiding the user through the process of identifying CEC key characteristics, how to c

  • Audio for "Sediment Cap Chemical Isolation Training," Jan 18, 2024

    18/01/2024

    In 2023, ITRC published the Sediment Cap Chemical Isolation Guidance to supplement the 2014 Contaminated Sediments Remediation Guidance with the goal of improving consistency in sediment cap performance outcomes. Sediment capping is a commonly selected remediation approach and numerous designs have been completed. Previous cap designs have been evaluated in multiple ways, and these varying approaches have led to some differences in selection of chemical design criteria, construction tolerance specifications, and monitoring/maintenance objectives for sites with similar characteristics and contaminants, leading to different expectations for long-term performance and reliability. The ITRC Sediment Cap Chemical Isolation Guidance provides a framework for the design, construction, and long-term monitoring of the chemical isolation function of sediment caps. The framework consists of an iterative design process informed by site-specific data that balances achievement of chemical design criteria, physical design co

  • Audio for "Optimizing Injection Strategies and In situ Remediation Performance," Dec 5, 2023

    05/12/2023

    In 2020, ITRC recognized that In situ remediation technologies using amendment injections have advanced to mainstream acceptance and offer a competitive advantage over many forms of ex situ treatment of soil and groundwater. Developing a detailed site-specific strategy is absolutely critical to the success of such in situ remedies. These strategies include conducting a thorough site characterization that will allow development of a detailed Conceptual Site Model (CSM) to guide critical analysis of subsurface features and improving remediation effectiveness. In the interest of developing expedited solutions, many past in situ remediation projects have been executed based on an incomplete understanding of the hydrogeology, geology, and contaminant distribution and mass. Some of these sites have undergone multiple rounds of in situ injections but have not advanced to closure. Better strategies and minimum design standards are required to decrease uncertainty and improve remedy effectiveness. In an effort to ov

  • Audio for "Conducting Climate Vulnerability Assessments at Superfund Sites: Lessons Learned," Nov 14, 2023

    14/11/2023

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Office of Superfund Remediation and Technology Innovation (OSRTI) is delivering a webinar summarizing lessons learned in conducting climate vulnerability assessments (CVAs) at sites on the National Priorities List (NPL). The webinar will cover:The underlying authorities to consider climate change at NPL sitesKey questions addressed through the climate vulnerability assessment processTools and data sources used to develop climate projectionsRecurring climate vulnerabilities that could affect remedy protectivenessThe associated adaptation measures needed to increase remedy resilience to climate impactsWhile the CVA process described in this webinar has been applied mostly to sites within the Superfund Program, it is considered "program neutral" and may be used as a guide for developing a CVA process and conducting CVAs at contaminated sites in other cleanup programs. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://w

  • Audio for "1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation," Nov 9, 2023

    09/11/2023

    In 2020, ITRC's 1,4-Dioxane team created multiple tools and documents that provide information to assist all interested stakeholders in understanding this contaminant and for making informed, educated decisions. Since the 1950s, 1,4-Dioxane has seen widespread use as a solvent stabilizer. The use of solvents through the 1980s suggests its presence at thousands of solvent sites in the US; however, it is not always a standard compound in typical analytical suites for hazardous waste sites, so it previously was overlooked. The U.S. EPA has classified 1,4-Dioxane as "likely to be carcinogenic to humans." Some states have devised health standards or regulatory guidelines for drinking water and groundwater standards; these are often sub-part per billion values. These low standards present challenges for analysis, characterization, and remediation of 1,4-Dioxane. The 1,4-Dioxane: Science, Characterization & Analysis, and Remediation training is a series of six (6) modules. The six individual modules will be presen

  • Audio for "Tools for PFAS Site Characterization: Session III - Standards, Passive Sampling, and Modeling of PFAS," Nov 8, 2023

    08/11/2023

    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is sponsoring a Risk e-Learning webinar series, hosted by CLU-IN, focused on research efforts to develop tools for sampling, monitoring, detecting, and characterizing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination. The three-part series will feature SRP-funded researchers and collaborators whose research focuses, in part, on understanding the distribution and fate of PFAS in the environment. The final session in this series will include federal and SRP researchers featuring useful resources that can aid in site characterization, such as PFAS reference materials, libraries, and passive samplers. To learn about and register for the other sessions in this webinar series, please see the SRP website. Jessica Reiner, Ph.D., of the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) will present on work being done focused on creating reference materials for quality assurance and quality control of measurements pertaining to organic pollutants in environmenta

  • Audio for "Microplastics," Nov 7, 2023

    07/11/2023

    In response to one of the biggest emerging environmental concerns, ITRC formed the Microplastics Team in 2021 to develop the Microplastics Guidance Document. Plastics have become pervasive in modern life and are now used in a wide range of commercial and industrial applications. Microplastics may result from the degradation and fragmentation of larger plastics, or they may be intentionally produced for specific applications and products. Regardless of their origin, microplastics are now ubiquitous in our environment. Because of their small size and pervasiveness in the environment, microplastics, along with any other contaminants which are adhered to the microplastics, may be inadvertently consumed by humans and other organisms. The online ITRC Guidance Document (available in February 2023) is geared toward an audience with reasonable level of scientific understanding, but not microplastic-specific knowledge. The guidance provides a user with information on microplastics and the state of the applied scienc

  • Audio for "Introduction to Brownfield All Appropriate Inquiries," Oct 30, 2023

    30/10/2023

    The brownfield amendments to CERCLA and the recent Brownfields Utilization, Investment and Local Development (BUILD) Act provide liability protections for certain landowners and potential property owners who did not cause or contribute to contamination at the property. This webinar offers an introduction or refresher on All Appropriate Inquiry (AAI), the process of evaluating a property's environmental conditions and assessing potential liability for any contamination. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/aai_103023/

  • Audio for "Introduction to the Hazard Ranking System (HRS)," Oct 26, 2023

    26/10/2023

    This course is for those with limited exposure to the HRS and those needing a refresher prior to performing an HRS site evaluation. This course will provide an introduction to the HRS by presenting overviews of its role in the Superfund program and site assessment process and its structure. This training will also provide overviews of the HRS factor categories (Likelihood of Release/Exposure, Waste Characteristics, Targets), including their general structure and the concepts and processes involved in scoring. This session is designed for Environmental professionals that conduct HRS evaluations as part of EPA site assessment in evaluating sites for the National Priorities List (NPL). The live session will include a 1 hour break. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/HRS-Introduction_102623/

  • Audio for "Tools for PFAS Site Characterization: Session II - PFAS Sources and Mapping," Oct 20, 2023

    20/10/2023

    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is sponsoring a Risk e-Learning webinar series, hosted by CLU-IN, focused on research efforts to develop tools for sampling, monitoring, detecting, and characterizing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination. The three-part series will feature SRP-funded researchers and collaborators whose research focuses, in part, on understanding the distribution and fate of PFAS in the environment. The second session will highlight case studies featuring SRP research to understand PFAS sources and to predict fate and transport. To learn about and register for the other sessions in this webinar series, please see the SRP website. Matthew Farrell is a Ph.D. candidate working in the Planchart Lab at North Carolina State University (NC State) working under Antonio Planchart, Ph.D. Matthew will present on the bioaccumulation and trophic transfer of several PFAS through aquatic food chains. He will expand on how this research was modeled through a system beginning w

  • Audio for "Strategies for Preventing and Managing Harmful Cyanobacteria Blooms (Two Part Series)," Oct 12, 2023

    12/10/2023

    The Harmful Cyanobacteria Blooms (HCBs) training reviews key information found in the two ITRC HCB Guidance Documents, the 2021 Strategies for Preventing and Managing Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms (HCB-1) and the 2022 companion document focused on benthic HCBs (HCB-2). ITRC's HCB-2 focuses on the ecology, toxin production, management, and mitigation of benthic HCBs and is a companion document to the HCB-1 document released by ITRC in March 2021. Cyanobacteria are microscopic, photosynthetic organisms that can be found naturally in all aquatic systems. Under certain conditions, cyanobacteria can multiply and become very abundant, discoloring the water throughout a water body, or accumulating at the surface. These occurrences are known as "harmful cyanobacterial blooms (HCBs)." HCBs can occur in many parts of a water body. Planktonic HCBs occur when cyanobacteria dominate the open water of water bodies. ITRC's HCB-1 guidance includes information about planktonic HCBs. In addition to being suspended in the op

  • Audio for "Tools for PFAS Site Characterization: Session I - Novel Analytical Chemistry Approaches," Oct 6, 2023

    06/10/2023

    The NIEHS Superfund Research Program (SRP) is sponsoring a Risk e-Learning webinar series, hosted by CLU-IN, focused on research efforts to develop tools for sampling, monitoring, detecting, and characterizing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) contamination. The three-part series will feature SRP-funded researchers and collaborators whose research focuses, in part, on understanding the distribution and fate of PFAS in the environment. The first session will feature SRP-funded investigators working on innovative methods to classify and/or quantify PFAS compounds. To learn about and register for the other sessions in this webinar series, please see the SRP website. Diana Aga, Ph.D., of the State University of New York at Buffalo (University at Buffalo) will discuss work affiliated with her R01 grant, Model-aided Design and Integration of Functionalized Hybrid Nanomaterials for Enhanced Bioremediation of Per-and Polyfluoroalkyl Substances. Discussed will be various complementary techniques used to

  • Audio for "Strategies for Preventing and Managing Harmful Cyanobacteria Blooms (Two Part Series)," Oct 5, 2023

    05/10/2023

    The Harmful Cyanobacteria Blooms (HCBs) training reviews key information found in the two ITRC HCB Guidance Documents, the 2021 Strategies for Preventing and Managing Harmful Cyanobacterial Blooms (HCB-1) and the 2022 companion document focused on benthic HCBs (HCB-2). ITRC's HCB-2 focuses on the ecology, toxin production, management, and mitigation of benthic HCBs and is a companion document to the HCB-1 document released by ITRC in March 2021. Cyanobacteria are microscopic, photosynthetic organisms that can be found naturally in all aquatic systems. Under certain conditions, cyanobacteria can multiply and become very abundant, discoloring the water throughout a water body, or accumulating at the surface. These occurrences are known as "harmful cyanobacterial blooms (HCBs)." HCBs can occur in many parts of a water body. Planktonic HCBs occur when cyanobacteria dominate the open water of water bodies. ITRC's HCB-1 guidance includes information about planktonic HCBs. In addition to being suspended in the op

  • Audio for "Revitalizing Rural Communities: Addressing Contaminated Sites Using the NEW Investment Playbook," Oct 3, 2023

    03/10/2023

    Rural community residents and leaders often wish to revitalize their downtowns but do not know where to start or how to pay for the needed planning and infrastructure to move development forward. Written through the lens of rural Appalachia, the revitalization approaches described in the Downtown Revitalization Playbook can be used by small communities across the United States. Rural downtowns often include properties with contaminant concerns, including brownfields and Superfund sites. The health and safety challenges posed by these contaminated spaces, alongside vacant storefronts and empty gathering places, reinforce downtown disinvestment. The playbook provides practical steps to organize a local team with the right mix of skills to reimagine, initiate and attract investment back to rural downtowns. To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/Revitalizing-Rural-Communities_100323/

  • Audio for "6PPD & 6PPD-quinone: Understanding and Mitigating the Emerging Global Contaminants," Sep 28, 2023

    28/09/2023

    The Interstate Technology & Regulatory Council (ITRC) together with the Australasian Land and Groundwater Association (ALGA) is holding a Workshop on the emerging contaminants, 6PPD and 6PPD-quinone. The Workshop will feature speakers from the United States, Australia, and Europe (NICOLE). The aim of this Workshop is to provide background on 6PPD and 6PPD-quinone, review the environmental and health risks, and highlight what is being done globally to find a solution. Time will be allotted for audience questions and answers.  6PPD-quinone was an unknown chemical until 2020 when Tian et al. identified it as the toxic agent killing coho salmon in Washington State. 6PPD-quinone is a reaction product of ozone and 6PPD, a tire anti-degradant that has been used for decades throughout the world and is recognized as one of the most toxic chemicals compared to substances with USEPA aquatic life criteria. In the short time since 6PPD-quinone's isolation and characterization, scientists have been working to better

  • Audio for "Updates in Use of Qualified Data in HRS Evaluations," Sep 28, 2023

    28/09/2023

    This one-hour session will review updates to EPA's fact sheet Using Qualified Data to Document an Observed Release and Observed Contamination and changes to how certain types of qualified data can be used in Hazard Ranking System (HRS) evaluations. This session is designed for Environmental professionals that conduct HRS evaluations as part of EPA site assessment in evaluating sites for the National Priorities List (NPL). To view this archive online or download the slides associated with this seminar, please visit http://www.clu-in.org/conf/tio/HRS-Qualified-Data_092823/

  • Audio for "ITRC: Pump & Treat Optimization," Sep 21, 2023

    21/09/2023

    ITRC's Pump & Treat (P&T) Optimization training aims to summarize existing information and best practices while also developing a systemic and adaptive optimization framework specifically for P&T well-network design and management. P&T systems have been one of the most commonly used methods for hydraulic containment and treatment of contaminated groundwater at sites with large groundwater plumes. This method cleans up groundwater contaminated with dissolved chemicals by pumping groundwater from wells to an above-ground treatment system that removes the contaminants. Optimization of P&T remedies is important for maintaining contaminant removal effectiveness throughout the operation lifetime and managing the system toward an exit strategy. A strategy for routine optimization of P&T remedies is key for maintaining the contaminant removal efficiency of these systems. The primary audience for this training is environmental project decision-makers, which may include federal, state, tribal, and various local agency

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