Stanford Scicast

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Sinopse

The Stanford SciCast is an undergraduate produced podcast bringing cardinal research news from Stanford scientists to you.

Episódios

  • SSC #14: Juul - A Case Of Ethics In Design

    SSC #14: Juul - A Case Of Ethics In Design

    20/11/2019 Duração: 19min

    Nicotine addiction is coming back with a vengeance. With e-cigarette companies like Juul capturing the attention of teens, we are experiencing the second wave of Big Tobacco through vaping. But what happens when a company’s mission statement and its actions are at odds? James Monsees and Adam Bowen, founders of Juul, were once Product Design Masters students here at Stanford. They claimed to have created a product that can transition smokers to their less harmful alternative, Juul. Although the product is used by ex-smokers, it is also used frequently by almost one million teens in the U.S. In this episode of Stanford SciCast, Ruth Adu-Daako, MBA-MS student and Brook Getachew, a former researcher on Juul, explore the relationship between design and ethics by using Juul as a case study. To understand this link, they interview Dr. Robert Jackler, head of the Stanford Research into the Impact of Tobacco Advertising, James Patell, a Herbert Hoover Professor at the Stanford Graduate School of Business, Ken Sho

  • SSC #13: Acid-loving Archaea - Past, Present and Future by Annika Brakebill and Nana Ansuah Peterson

    SSC #13: Acid-loving Archaea - Past, Present and Future by Annika Brakebill and Nana Ansuah Peterson

    13/11/2019 Duração: 25min

    Picture an active, bubbling volcano, or, if you can, a hydrothermal vent, or even perhaps a cauldron full of boiling hot water into which you now add some acid. Do you particularly associate this imagery with life? It’s hard to imagine that there could be living things in these conditions, yet there are microbes that eat, breathe, and flourish in these places. These bugs are extremophiles, literally, lovers of the extreme. How do they survive and thrive in their intense home environments? In this podcast episode, Annika and Nana Ansuah interview Dr. Paula Welander, a Stanford professor whose research lies at the intersection of geology and microbiology, about her recently published paper on extremophiles called Sulfolobus acidocaldarius. Her group showed for the first time that a modification in the membranes of Sulfolobus allows it to live in its extreme home--the hot acid soup you pictured above--and to survive when these conditions fluctuate. Dr. Welander also takes us through her path to geomicrobiology

  • SSC #12: The Origin of Everything by Micah Cash and Jiren Zhu

    SSC #12: The Origin of Everything by Micah Cash and Jiren Zhu

    06/11/2019 Duração: 33min

    One of humankind’s most enduring and exciting mysteries is the origin of our universe. For most of history, we could only look up to the skies and speculate on how the world came into existence. Now, modern technology has given us astonishing insight into the universe’s beginnings, inspiring groundbreaking new theories. But what if all this knowledge has only produced deeper, philosophical questions about the world’s oldest question? Renata Kallosh, a leading theoretical physicist at Stanford, spends her days peering into the early universe searching for the elusive theory of quantum gravity. In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, Micah and Jiren talk to Kallosh about what cosmology and physics can tell us about the origins of the universe, and what scientists hope to find in the future. Next, Stanford philosopher of science Thomas Ryckman tells us about the challenges faced by those trying answering the deepest questions about the world. It turns out that trying to understand every aspect of nature is f

  • SSC #11: Preterm Birth by Margot Bellon and Nomi Ringach

    SSC #11: Preterm Birth by Margot Bellon and Nomi Ringach

    30/10/2019 Duração: 30min

    Do you know the story of when you were born? Was it a perfectly planned out day that culminated in your unblemished birth? Or, was it riddled with unexpected curveballs. Maybe you surprised your parents a few weeks early? In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, Nomi and Margot discuss the causes and consequences of premature births through the lenses of microbiology, preeclampsia, and women’s health. Today, they clear the air of any icky gut reactions you may have to discussing the vaginal microbiome. After explaining how it influences pregnancy health, they dive into the hot topic of women’s health research, analyzing its main driving forces and mysterious angles, including the not yet understood disease of preeclampsia. Nomi and Margot were able to gather a diversity of perspectives on pregnancy and pinpoint the areas of research that merit more awareness and funding. Dr. Relman, Stanford Professor of Microbiology and Immunology, Dr. Virginia Winn, Stanford Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Dr. Ma

  • SSC #10: Brain Balls: Effective Communication or Misinformed Hype? by Robel Daniel and Amanda Urke

    SSC #10: Brain Balls: Effective Communication or Misinformed Hype? by Robel Daniel and Amanda Urke

    23/10/2019 Duração: 28min

    In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, Robel Daniel and Amanda Urke explore the many factors influencing how complicated and often controversial science is conducted, communicated to non-expert audiences, and perceived by the public. Through conversations with Stanford Bioengineering Professor Drew Endy and Stanford science writer Bruce Goldman, Robel and Amanda explore the philosophical basis and limitations of scientific communication and how it is achieved in today’s media. Thank you to Stanford Bioengineering Professor Drew Endy and Stanford science writer Bruce Goldman for sharing their perspectives on science and how it’s communicated, and to Professor Jennifer Stonaker for her guidance in the production of this podcast. To learn more about Dr. Pasca’s research, visit his lab website at https://www.pascalab.org/. Image credit: “Brain Human Anatomy” by sbtlneet is is licensed under the Pixabay license. Music credit: “Perihelion” by Arvind Ranganathan, used with personal and explicit permission. His c

  • Sea-ing the Environment: Virtual Reality and Ocean Education by Andrew, Hanna and Laura

    Sea-ing the Environment: Virtual Reality and Ocean Education by Andrew, Hanna and Laura

    01/06/2019 Duração: 36min

    Can you imagine a reality where you could explore the ocean without getting wet? How about flying through the clouds without leaving the ground? How might your perspective of swimming or flying change? In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, Andrew Pollack, a CS major, and Hanna Payne and Laura Anderson, two marine scientists, explore the world of virtual reality and the impact of technology on environmental education. What are the benefits of VR experiences and can virtual “dives” increase care and understanding of the ocean? As the team learns about the VR industry with Megan O’Connor of Unity Technologies and environmental education with Indira Phukan from Stanford’s Graduate School of Education, they see how technology and education can intersect. They also experience ocean VR with Talia Weiss and Geraldine Fauville at the Stanford Virtual Human Interaction Lab and Erika Woolsey, an Ocean Design Fellow and CEO of The Hydrous. From coral reefs to kelp forests, dive into the world of virtual reality

  • SciCast Season3 Preview

    SciCast Season3 Preview

    31/05/2019 Duração: 05min

    Preview for season 3 of the Stanford SciCast, the podcast bringing cardinal research news from Stanford scientists to you. This podcast is produced by students in a course offered by Stanford’s Program in Writing and Rhetoric.

  • SSC #8: Understanding Water In The West by Kira Minehart and Nate Nunez

    SSC #8: Understanding Water In The West by Kira Minehart and Nate Nunez

    22/07/2015 Duração: 16min

    In this episode of Stanford SciCast, Nate Nunez and Kira Minehart break down the inner workings of California’s water management systems. They interview Leon Szeptycki, director of Stanford’s Water in the West research program. Szeptycki discusses the necessity of modernizing the state’s antiquated water management systems, some of which date back to the Gold Rush. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSC #7: Social Media: A Mirror To The Self? by Raga Ayyagari and Skylar Cohen

    SSC #7: Social Media: A Mirror To The Self? by Raga Ayyagari and Skylar Cohen

    22/07/2015 Duração: 32min

    In this episode, Skylar Cohen and Raga Ayyagari discuss how scientists use big data analysis to predict and understand patterns in personality. They explore the science behind big data, its applications in personality analysis, and how this information changes how we interact with ourselves and others. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSC #6: Climate Change And The Ticking Clock by Maria Doerr and Emma Hutchinson

    SSC #6: Climate Change And The Ticking Clock by Maria Doerr and Emma Hutchinson

    20/07/2015 Duração: 21min

    In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, Emma Hutchinson and Maria Doerr explore what it means to be a scientist studying issues relating to climate change. How did they start working on climate change? How do they see their role in the public sphere? How do they deal with opposition to the results of their studies? Image Credit: Time is ticking out. by mao_lini is licensed under CC BY-SA-2.0; Music Credit: Podington Bear is licensed under CC BY-NC-3.0

  • SSC #5: Altruism Dissected by Laurie Rumker and James Spicer

    SSC #5: Altruism Dissected by Laurie Rumker and James Spicer

    14/07/2015 Duração: 19min

    In this episode of the Stanford SciCast, James Spicer and Laurie Rumker explore the nature of human altruism: how we define it, whether it is innate or learned, and what makes humans behave altruistically. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #12: Powering Implanted Medical Devices By James Spicer

    SSM #12: Powering Implanted Medical Devices By James Spicer

    09/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    A new study published by Stanford Researchers heralds safe, life-saving body implants that never run out of power. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #11: Superspreaders By Laurie Rumker

    SSM #11: Superspreaders By Laurie Rumker

    08/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    Antibiotics are a powerful, life-saving treatment against bacterial infection, but recent research by Denise Monack and her colleagues at the Stanford School of Medicine suggests that in some cases antibiotics may actually amplify the problem they are intended to solve. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #10: Sleep And Suicide Risk By Nate Nunez

    SSM #10: Sleep And Suicide Risk By Nate Nunez

    07/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    What if the easiest way to prevent suicides has been under our control all along? A Stanford Suicide Prevention Research Laboratory experiment led by Rebecca Bernert, PhD showed that participants who reported poor sleep had a 1.4 times greater chance of death by suicide within ten years than participants who reported sleeping well. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #9: Measuring Groundwater By Kira Minehart

    SSM #9: Measuring Groundwater By Kira Minehart

    06/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    Many of today’s environmental issues revolve around measuring and conserving precious resources. Some resources, like groundwater, are difficult to monitor since they are located meters below the Earth’s surface and are invisible to the human eye. However, researchers at Stanford University are exploring the use of satellite imagery to measure groundwater contained in aquifers. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #8: Urban Agriculture By Emma Hutchinson

    SSM #8: Urban Agriculture By Emma Hutchinson

    03/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    What images come to mind when you think of “agriculture”? Can you imagine a field that stretches for miles? A small family farm located far away from the bustling streets of the world’s biggest cities? Well, think again. A recent study by Stanford professor Eric Lambin shows that there is an increasing trend of urban agriculture. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #7: Protecting Ecosystems by Maria Doerr

    SSM #7: Protecting Ecosystems by Maria Doerr

    02/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    You can’t have day without night, land without sea, or a protected species without a protected ecosystem. A group of Stanford scientists would suggest you must protect a threatened species as well as the ecosystem in which it lives. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #6: Optical Computing By Skylar Cohen

    SSM #6: Optical Computing By Skylar Cohen

    01/07/2015 Duração: 01min

    Computing speeds have become faster and faster in the last few decades, but soon they may go at the speed of light. Fiber optics, which uses light to transmit data, has already revolutionized internet connections, but Stanford researchers may have found a way to integrate this technology into computers themselves. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSM #5: Coastal Water Quality By Raga Ayyagari

    SSM #5: Coastal Water Quality By Raga Ayyagari

    30/06/2015 Duração: 01min

    Imagine you are preparing for a day at the beach. You may check the weather report, and scout out nice restaurants beside the water. However, most people do not check what’s actually in the water. Each year, millions of swimmers get illnesses like stomach upsets, rashes, and respiratory infections from high levels of contaminants and harmful bacteria in the water. Listen to find out what Stanford scientists are doing to solve this problem. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

  • SSC #4: DeExtinction by Joe Getsy

    SSC #4: DeExtinction by Joe Getsy

    25/04/2014 Duração: 33min

    In this final episode from season 1 of the Stanford SciCast, Joe Getsy speaks with Stanford’s Dr. Hank Greely about the promise and implications of bringing extinct organisms back to life. For more information visit stanfordscicast.wordpress.com

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