Pbs Newshour - Segments

Informações:

Sinopse

Select the specific PBS NewsHour updates, in-depth reports, interviews and analysis that match your interests. (Updated daily)

Episódios

  • Educators, counselors focus on mental health as students return to the classroom

    01/08/2021 Duração: 08min

    After more than a year of restrictions and online schooling, educators and counselors are focusing on ways to assess the long-term social, emotional and mental impact of the pandemic on school children when they return to the classroom. Christopher Booker reports from Fairfield County, Connecticut as part of our ongoing series, "Roads to Recovery." PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Exhibition sheds light on Kalief Browder's years in solitary confinement

    01/08/2021 Duração: 06min

    Sixteen-year-old Kalief Browder spent three years inside New York City's Rikers Island without being convicted of a crime, enduring two of those years in solitary confinement. He subsequently struggled with his mental health and eventually took his own life. A new exhibition at the artist space "Pioneer Works" in Brooklyn called "Kalief Browder: The Box" seeks to shed light on Browder's strength in the face of his long periods in solitary confinement. Ivette Feliciano reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Masks, vaccinations, Delta: Why we are at a 'critical point' in the pandemic

    01/08/2021 Duração: 08min

    Surges in Delta cases across the nation have changed and undone some of the progress made against the COVID-19 pandemic: the CDC has advised fully vaccinated people to remain cautious and even wear masks indoors. Jessica Malaty Rivera, an infectious disease epidemiologist and research fellow at Boston Children's Hospital joins to discuss the potential risks posed by the Delta variant. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Millions of tenants at risk as federal eviction ban ends

    31/07/2021 Duração: 06min

    The federal ban on evictions is set to expire tonight. A last-minute effort by House Dems to extend the moratorium failed late yesterday, and the Supreme Court ruled that the moratorium could not be extended without new legislation from Congress. A Census survey found that as of July 5, roughly 3.6 million people are at risk of eviction in the next two months. Emily Benfer, visiting professor of law and public health at Wake Forest University, joins. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Minorities struggle for headway in the legal weed business

    31/07/2021 Duração: 11min

    In 2016, Massachusetts voters approved an initiative that required the state to create policies that would bring those disproportionately impacted by the war on drugs into the new legal cannabis industry. Today, minority-owned businesses make up only a small fraction of the hundreds of marijuana dispensaries in the state. Special Correspondent Kira Kay reports on why equity candidates are struggling in the legal weed industry. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What to know about the CDC's delta variant study and how it affects vaccinated Americans

    30/07/2021 Duração: 07min

    The World Health Organization said COVID-19 infections are up 80% around the world in the last month, overwhelming health systems in many countries. In the U.S., the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention released a pivotal study showing fully vaccinated people can spread the delta variant as readily as non-vaccinated people. Amna Nawaz gets the details from Brown University's Dr. Ashish Jha. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Trump tax returns must go to Congress, DOJ tells Treasury

    30/07/2021 Duração: 05min

    In our news wrap Friday, newly disclosed documents highlight the pressure from former President Trump on the Justice Department to overturn the 2020 election results. On a second front, the Justice Department directed the Treasury Department to hand over Trump's tax returns to Congress. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi appealed to the CDC to take emergency action on the expiring eviction moratorium. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • First Afghan interpreters, their families arrive in the U.S. on special visas

    30/07/2021 Duração: 03min

    More than 200 Afghans eligible for special immigrant visas arrived in Virginia Friday. They are the first group of former interpreters -- and their families -- who worked with American soldiers on the ground. They're being evacuated by the Biden administration just weeks before the U.S. withdrawal is complete and as Taliban violence increases. Nick Schifrin joins Judy Woodruff to discuss. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • CIA still investigating cause of 'Havana Syndrome' ailments affecting U.S. diplomats

    30/07/2021 Duração: 03min

    Judy Woodruff and Nick Schifrin discuss the debilitating medical ailments affecting U.S. diplomatic and intelligence officers in Cuba -- which have become known as Havana Syndrome. Six months in, what steps has the Biden administration taken to aid those affected? PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Hong Kong residents worry vague new immigration law could let China ban them from leaving

    30/07/2021 Duração: 07min

    A pro-democracy protester in Hong Kong was sentenced Friday to nine years in prison, the first prosecution under Beijing's national security law. Now a new amendment to the city's immigration law takes effect Sunday that China says targets illegal refugees. But as special correspondent Richard Kimber reports, critics say the law's wording is vague and could ban residents from leaving the city. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Brooks and Dionne on vaccine hesitancy, Capitol Police testimony, infrastructure

    30/07/2021 Duração: 13min

    New York Times columnist David Brooks and E.J. Dionne from The Washington Post join Judy Woodruff to discuss the bipartisan infrastructure deal, new information about the delta variant's threat, and the Capitol Police testimony during the Jan. 6 hearings. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Marcia Chatelain examines McDonald's' mixed impact on Black America

    30/07/2021 Duração: 07min

    Fast food is a staple of American culture, but in recent decades there has been a new focus on health and wage inequality. Jeffrey Brown talks to author Marcia Chatelain about the complicated history of McDonalds in the Black community: how the fast food giant supported Black franchise owners, but was a trap for unhealthy diets and low wages. It's part of our arts and culture series, CANVAS. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • A geologist's Brief But Spectacular take on calling out harassment and sexism in science

    30/07/2021 Duração: 04min

    Jane Willenbring is a geologist who solves problems related to the earth's surface. In 2020, she was featured in a NOVA documentary called "Picture a Scientist." She and two other women shared their experiences in the sciences, ranging from brutal harassment to years of subtle slights. Tonight, she gives her Brief But Spectacular take on making science more diverse, equitable and open to all. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Partisan attacks over mask mandates, vaccines underscore deep divide over COVID

    29/07/2021 Duração: 03min

    Roughly 2.7 million civilians working for the federal government now have a big choice to make about COVID-19 shots as President Joe Biden moves to require federal workers get vaccinated or face regular testing. That decision, and the return to the recommendation for Americans to wear face masks indoors, is causing a deep divide across the country, and in Congress. Yamiche Alcindor reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Vaccine, mask opponents are fueling the delta variant's death toll. Will incentives help?

    29/07/2021 Duração: 06min

    Judy Woodruff discusses the latest on COVID-19's spread in the U.S. -- which is surging thanks to the delta variant -- and how incentives for those who are unvaccinated and anti-maskers will affect the situation with Dr. Paul Offit, director of the Vaccine Education Center at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, and a member of the Food and Drug Administration's vaccine advisory board. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Missouri public health official abused by hostile crowd over support for mask mandate

    29/07/2021 Duração: 07min

    The frustration over masking mandates that has been playing out around the country erupted in Missouri Tuesday night during a county council meeting that focused on the new mask mandates issued just the day before. Dr. Faisal Khan, the acting director of the St Louis County Health Department called to testify during that meeting, faced racial slurs, verbal attacks and even physical intimidation. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • News Wrap: Congress approves $2 billion in emergency spending for Capitol security

    29/07/2021 Duração: 05min

    In our news wrap Thursday, the U.S. Congress gave final approval today to $2 billion in emergency spending for Capitol security. The Biden administration will allow a nationwide ban on evictions imposed during the pandemic to expire Saturday. The U.S. Commerce Department said economic growth reached an annual rate of 6.5% in the year's second quarter. On wall street, stocks managed modest gains. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Japan ignored months of protests to host the Olympics. The opposition is still growing

    29/07/2021 Duração: 06min

    Tokyo on Thursday registered its highest number yet of COVID-19 cases. Amid American triumphs in the gym and the pool, the reigning world champion pole vaulter Sam Kendricks was forced to leave after testing positive. The Japanese public is split between cheering the medal count and fearing the virus. Opposition to the games has only grown. Special correspondent Phoebe Amoroso reports from Tokyo. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • What Suni Lee's gymnastics gold win means to Hmong Americans

    29/07/2021 Duração: 07min

    American gymnast Sunisa Lee's gold medal in gymnastics Thursday makes her the first Hmong American to participate and win in the Olympics. Lee said she trains daily for first-generation Americans and wanted to win for Hmong Americans. John Yang reports on the reaction within the Hmong American community with Bo Thao-Urabe, founder and executive director of the Coalition of Asian American Leaders. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

  • Idaho ranchers torn between hunting and deterrents for gray wolves harming their livestock

    29/07/2021 Duração: 08min

    The grey wolf was once nearly hunted to extinction in the U.S. until the federal government put it on the endangered species list in 1974. 20 years later, it was successfully reintroduced to Idaho and Yellowstone. As pack numbers grew, the gray wolf was taken off the list. But more than 50 wildlife groups are worried it may face endangerment again from expanded hunting. William Brangham reports. PBS NewsHour is supported by - https://www.pbs.org/newshour/about/funders

página 1 de 2