Sinopse

An audio version of the best of the Financial Times's Big Reads in-depth reporting from FT correspondents around the world. Listen to longform stories that explore and explain key themes in world news, science and business. Produced by Anna Dedhar.

Episódios

  • Putins pivot to Africa

    Putin's pivot to Africa

    25/01/2019 Duração: 12min

    As Russia’s relations with the west deteriorate Moscow is seeking fresh alliances across Africa say Henry Foy, Nastassia Astrasheuskaya and David Pilling. With Moscow often sidestepping demands for reform or protection of human rights, this is starting to raise concern in western capitals.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Wells Fargo: repairing a damaged brand

    Wells Fargo: repairing a damaged brand

    16/01/2019 Duração: 12min

    Wells Fargo has lurched from one scandal to another but customers have stayed loyal, say Robert Armstrong and Laura Noonan. Can the bank once seen as the best managed in America recover its premium valuation? Produced by Caroline Grady  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Data brokers: regulators tackle the privacy deathstars

    Data brokers: regulators tackle the 'privacy deathstars'

    10/01/2019 Duração: 13min

    Data brokers face heightened scrutiny in Europe as public opinion shifts on questions of privacy and businesses face tougher data protection legislation, say Aliya Ram and Madhumita Murgia. Will recent operational changes at data brokers be enough to convince regulators? Produced by Caroline Grady  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Person of the Year 2018: George Soros

    Person of the Year 2018: George Soros

    21/12/2018 Duração: 21min

    The Financial Times has chosen George Soros as its Person of the Year and here editor Lionel Barber and deputy editor Roula Khalaf explain why the billionaire philanthropist and liberal standard bearer merits the title, particularly in 2018. Presented by Robert Shrimsley and produced by Anna Dedhar  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The university challenge

    The university challenge

    14/12/2018 Duração: 13min

    The November sentencing of British academic Matthew Hedges to life in prison for spying caused a rare public spat between the UK and UAE and although he was subsequently pardoned it has led UK and US institutions to reassess their links to oil-rich Gulf states, say Andrew England and Simeon Kerr. Does foreign funding influence research on the region and damage the reputation of institutions or enhance academic ties?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The end of the games console?

    The end of the games console?

    05/12/2018 Duração: 12min

    Nintendo, Sony’s Playstation, and Microsoft’s Xbox dominate the cut-throat computer game business. But, says Leo Lewis, these console makers look under threat in the era of streaming. Will the cloud win, or can consoles, with higher quality, more complex games, keep their place? Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Who will replace Merkel as head of the CDU?

    Who will replace Merkel as head of the CDU?

    29/11/2018 Duração: 12min

    In October, Angela Merkel announced she would be stepping down as leader of the Christian Democratic Union, the party she has headed for nearly two decades. The race to succeed her is now well underway, says Guy Chazan. Three candidates have emerged in a battle that will decide whether the party stays its course or turns to the right. Produced by Anna Dedhar and Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The battle between Modi and Indias central bank

    The battle between Modi and India's central bank

    22/11/2018 Duração: 14min

    The Reserve Bank of India is embroiled in an intense political battle with Prime Minister Narendra Modi, say Simon Mundy and Henny Sender. The government has long pressured the RBI to do more to boost growth, but a possible economic slowdown has seen Mr Modi ramp up his attacks. Can the RBI’s legally fragile independence hold? Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Why sanctions are failing to isolate Russia

    Why sanctions are failing to isolate Russia

    13/11/2018 Duração: 13min

    After Russia annexed Crimea in 2014, the west imposed sanctions to isolate the country economically. But, says Henry Foy, the reality has not matched the rhetoric. Moscow has pivoted towards China and Saudi Arabia and its energy ties with the EU remain strong. Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The threat of Chinese ‘military-civil fusion’

    The threat of Chinese ‘military-civil fusion’

    08/11/2018 Duração: 15min

    Western governments have a new nightmare coming from China, which has decreed that new private sector technologies, such as robotics and AI, must be shared with the military, say Kathrin Hille and Richard Waters. Washington fears Beijing is gaining an advantage in a new arms race. Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The Irish backstop: Brexits biggest hurdle

    The Irish backstop: Brexit's biggest hurdle

    31/10/2018 Duração: 17min

    Since Britain voted to leave the EU, the Irish “backstop” has become the primary obstacle in the way of a Brexit deal, say Alex Barker and Arthur Beesley. The plan is the result of intense diplomacy by Dublin, but Theresa May faces implacable opposition to it from Brexiters and Arlene Foster’s DUP. Just how did the issue become so important? Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • How Khashoggis death threatens Saudi Arabias economy

    How Khashoggi's death threatens Saudi Arabia's economy

    25/10/2018 Duração: 14min

    Under the stewardship of its young crown prince Mohammed bin Salman, Saudi Arabia has sought to turn around its oil-dependent economy, say Andrew England and Simeon Kerr. Yet the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi has made the task of reshaping the kingdom’s economy by attracting overseas money much harder. Produced by Harry Robertson  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Trumps divided America goes to the polls

    Trump's divided America goes to the polls

    17/10/2018 Duração: 12min

    Next month’s US midterm elections will be some of the most important in a generation, says Demetri Sevastopulo. Should the Democratic party regain a majority in the House of Representatives, they could make life very difficult for President Donald Trump. But conservatives are also fired up for the fight  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Artificial intelligence: can humans and robots work together?

    Artificial intelligence: can humans and robots work together?

    10/10/2018 Duração: 16min

    The nightmare of robots controlling the human race will not come true, says Richard Waters. The future of AI will see semi-autonomous systems rely on close cooperation with people, uniting machine learning and human judgement. But there are dangers in robots leading humans astray  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Unraveling Danskes €200bn dirty money scandal

    Unraveling Danske's €200bn 'dirty money' scandal

    03/10/2018 Duração: 17min

    Since Howard Wilkinson, Danske Bank’s then head of markets in Estonia, blew the whistle on money laundering in 2013, the enormous scale of wrongdoing has emerged, report Richard Milne and Caroline Binham. It has cost chief executive Thomas Borgen his job, and raised grave questions about the bank’s relationships with Russian entities and its regulators  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The scramble for business in Africa

    The scramble for business in Africa

    27/09/2018 Duração: 14min

    Emerging economic powerhouses like China, India, and Turkey are jockeying for opportunities and influence in sub-Saharan Africa. While many of the continent's leaders see this as a great opportunity to boost growth, others warn of the dangers of increasing foreign domination  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Ronaldo: Juventus bets big on the Portuguese striker

    Ronaldo: Juventus bets big on the Portuguese striker

    18/09/2018 Duração: 13min

    The Italian football club will pay some €340m over four seasons for Cristiano Ronaldo, gambling that he will lure fans and deals with sponsors and kitmakers, says Murad Ahmed. But it is a risky strategy. Can it pay off?  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • The opioid marketing machine

    The opioid marketing machine

    12/09/2018 Duração: 15min

    Purdue Pharma faces more than 1,000 lawsuits claiming it ignited and fuelled the US opioid crisis, reports David Crow. Prosecutors say the company exaggerated the benefits of its painkiller OxyContin, but through their ownership of Rhodes Pharma, Purdue’s owners also have a far bigger market share than was realised.  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Genoa bridge collapse: the battle over privatisation

    Genoa bridge collapse: the battle over privatisation

    05/09/2018 Duração: 13min

    On August 14, the Morandi bridge in Genoa collapsed, killing at least 43 people. Since then, many Italian politicians have blamed the tragic event on a lack of maintenance, says Hannah Roberts, and linked it to crony capitalism and policies of privatisation. This argument over privatisation is emblematic of a divided Italy  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

  • Auditing: how to restore faith in the ‘Big Four’

    Auditing: how to restore faith in the ‘Big Four’

    29/08/2018 Duração: 17min

    PwC’s mechanical interpretation of the rules failed to produce results representative of Bank of Ireland’s dangerous position leading up to the financial crisis. This, say Jonathan Ford and Madison Marriage, raises questions about auditing judgment, and who the ‘Big Four’ firms really serve. As part of our ‘Auditing in Crisis’ series, they report on the history and future of “true and fair” accounting  See acast.com/privacy for privacy and opt-out information.

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