Breaking Math Podcast

Informações:

Sinopse

Breaking Math is a podcast that aims to make math accessible to everyone, and make it enjoyable. Every other week, topics such as chaos theory, forbidden formulas, and more will be covered in detail. If you have 45 or so minutes to spare, you're almost guaranteed to learn something new! Become a supporter of this podcast:https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

Episódios

  • P8: Tangent Tango (Morikawas Recently Solved Problem)

    P8: Tangent Tango (Morikawa's Recently Solved Problem)

    25/02/2021 Duração: 23min

    Join Sofía and Gabriel as they talk about Morikawa's recently solved problem, first proposed in 1821 and not solved until last year! Also, if you haven't yet, check out our sponsor The Great Courses at thegreatcoursesplus.com/breakingmath for a free month! Learn basically anything there. The paper featured in this episode can be found at https://arxiv.org/abs/2008.00922 This episode is distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org! [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • P7: Root for Squares (Irrationality of the Square Root of Two)

    P7: Root for Squares (Irrationality of the Square Root of Two)

    07/02/2021 Duração: 17min

    Join Sofía and Gabriel as they discuss an old but great proof of the irrationality of the square root of two. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:   theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!           brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon-Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.com/breakingmathpodcast Ad contained music track "Buffering" from Quiet Music for Tiny Robots. Distributed under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License. For more information, visit creativecommons.org. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. http

  • 57: You Said How Much?! (Measure Theory)

    57: You Said How Much?! (Measure Theory)

    01/02/2021 Duração: 33min

    If you are there, and I am here, we can measure the distance between us. If we are standing in a room, we can calculate the area of where we're standing; and, if we want, the volume. These are all examples of measures; which, essentially, tell us how much 'stuff' we have. So what is a measure? How are distance, area, and volume related? And how big is the Sierpinski triangle? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math. Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:   theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking here and signing up!    brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon-Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise-Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.com/breakingmathpodcast The theme for this episode was written by Elliot Smith. Episo

  • P6: How Many Angles in a Circle? (Curvature Euclidean Geometry)

    P6: How Many Angles in a Circle? (Curvature; Euclidean Geometry)

    28/01/2021 Duração: 31min

    Sofía and Gabriel discuss the question of "how many angles are there in a circle", and visit theorems from Euclid, as well as differential calculus. This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:   theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!            brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon-Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.com/breakingmathpodcast The theme for this episode was written by Elliot Smith. Music in the ad was Tiny Robot Armies by Quiet Music for Tiny Robots. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode i

  • 56: More Sheep than You Can Count (Transfinite Cardinal Numbers)

    56: More Sheep than You Can Count (Transfinite Cardinal Numbers)

    24/01/2021 Duração: 37min

    Look at all you phonies out there. You poseurs. All of you sheep. Counting 'til infinity. Counting sheep. *pff* What if I told you there were more there? Like, ... more than you can count? But what would a sheeple like you know about more than infinity that you can count? heh. *pff* So, like, what does it mean to count til infinity? What does it mean to count more? And, like, where do dimensions fall in all of this? Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:   theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!              brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon-Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.com/breakingmathpodcast (Correction

  • 55: Order in the Court (Transfinite Ordinal Numbers)

    55: Order in the Court (Transfinite Ordinal Numbers)

    14/01/2021 Duração: 34min

    As a child, did you ever have a conversation that went as follows: "When I grow up, I want to have a million cats" "Well I'm gonna have a billion billion cats" "Oh yeah? I'm gonna have infinity cats" "Then I'm gonna have infinity plus one cats" "That's nothing. I'm gonna have infinity infinity cats" "I'm gonna have infinity infinity infinity infinity *gasp* infinity so many infinities that there are infinity infinities plus one cats" What if I told you that you were dabbling in the transfinite ordinal numbers? So what are ordinal numbers? What does "transfinite" mean? And what does it mean to have a number one larger than another infinite number? [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Diane Baca] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:   theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up! brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of

  • 54: Oodles (Large Numbers)

    54: Oodles (Large Numbers)

    21/12/2020 Duração: 28min

    There are a lot of things in the universe, but no matter how you break them down, you will still have far fewer particles than even some of the smaller of what we're calling the 'very large numbers'. Many people have a fascination with these numbers, and perhaps it is because their sheer scale can boggle the mind. So what numbers can be called 'large'? When are they useful? And what is the Ackermann function? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Diane Baca] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:     theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!    brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.

  • 53: Big Brain Time (An Interview with Peter Zeidman from the UCL Institute of Neurology)

    53: Big Brain Time (An Interview with Peter Zeidman from the UCL Institute of Neurology)

    11/12/2020 Duração: 45min

    Neuroscience is a topic that, in many ways, is in its infancy. The tools that are being used in this field are constantly being honed and reevaluated as our understanding of the brain and mind increase. And it's no surprise: the brain is responsible for the way we interact with the world, and the idea that ideas hone one another is not new to anyone who possesses a mind. But how can the tools that we use to study the brain and the mind be linked? How do the mind and the brain encode one another? And what does Bayes have to do with this? All of this and more on this episode of Breaking Math. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch; Peter Zeidman] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:     theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!    brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of Brilliant Premium! Pa

  • 52: Round (Circles and Spheres)

    52: Round (Circles and Spheres)

    05/12/2020 Duração: 32min

    Spheres and circles are simple objects. They are objects that are uniformly curved throughout in some way or another. They can also be defined as objects which have a boundary that is uniformly distant from some point, using some definition of distance. Circles and spheres were integral to the study of mathematics at least from the days of Euclid, being the objects generated by tracing the ends of idealized compasses. However, these objects have many wonderful and often surprising mathematical properties. To this point, a circle's circumference divided by its diameter is the mathematical constant pi, which has been a topic of fascination for mathematicians for as long as circles have been considered. [Featuring Sofía Baca; Meryl Flaherty] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:      theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!      brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign

  • P5: All Your Base Are Belong to Us (Fractional Base Proof)

    P5: All Your Base Are Belong to Us (Fractional Base Proof)

    26/11/2020 Duração: 14min

    Join Sofia and Gabriel on this problem episode where we explore "base 3-to-2" — a base system we explored on the last podcast — and how it relates to "base 3/2" from last episode. [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • 51: Episode -2,0,1 (Bases Exotic Bases)

    51: Episode "-2,0,1" (Bases; Exotic Bases)

    15/11/2020 Duração: 35min

    A numerical base is a system of representing numbers using a sequence of symbols. However, like any mathematical concept, it can be extended and re-imagined in many different forms. A term used occasionally in mathematics is the term 'exotic', which just means 'different than usual in an odd or quirky way'. In this episode we are covering exotic bases. We will start with something very familiar (viz., decimal points) as a continuation of our previous episode, and then progress to the more odd, such as non-integer and complex bases. So how can the base systems we covered last time be extended to represent fractional numbers? How can fractional numbers be used as a base for integers? And what is pi plus e times i in base i + 1? This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca; Merryl Flaherty] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:       theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of th

  • 50: Episode 101 (Bases)

    50: Episode "101" (Bases)

    31/08/2020 Duração: 45min

    Numbering was originally done with tally marks: the number of tally marks indicated the number of items being counted, and they were grouped together by fives. A little later, people wrote numbers down by chunking the number in a similar way into larger numbers: there were symbols for ten, ten times that, and so forth, for example, in ancient Egypt; and we are all familiar with the Is, Vs, Xs, Ls, Cs, and Ds, at least, of Roman numerals. However, over time, several peoples, including the Inuit, Indians, Sumerians, and Mayans, had figured out how to chunk numbers indefinitely, and make numbers to count seemingly uncountable quantities using the mind, and write them down in a few easily mastered motions. These are known as place-value systems, and the study of bases has its root in them: talking about bases helps us talk about what is happening when we use these magical symbols. --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https:

  • #BLACKOUTDAY2020

    #BLACKOUTDAY2020

    03/06/2020 Duração: 08min

    #BLACKOUTDAY2020 George Perry Floyd was murdered by police on May 25, 2020. Learn more on twitter or your favorite search engine by searching #BLACKOUTDAY2020 --- Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • 49: Thinking Machines II (Techniques in Artificial Intelligence)

    49: Thinking Machines II (Techniques in Artificial Intelligence)

    26/05/2020 Duração: 57min

    Machines have been used to simplify labor since time immemorial, and simplify thought in the last few hundred years. We are at a point now where we have the electronic computer to aid us in our endeavor, which allows us to build hypothetical thinking machines by simply writing their blueprints — namely, the code that represents their function — in a general way that can be easily reproduced by others. This has given rise to an astonishing array of techniques used to process data, and in recent years, much focus has been given to methods that are used to answer questions where the question or answer is not always black and white. So what is machine learning? What problems can it be used to solve? And what strategies are used in developing novel approaches to machine learning problems? This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. For more Breaking Math info, visit BreakingMathPodcast.app [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] References: https://spec

  • 48: Thinking Machines (Philosophical Basis of Artificial Intelligence)

    48: Thinking Machines (Philosophical Basis of Artificial Intelligence)

    18/05/2020 Duração: 59min

    Machines, during the lifetime of anyone who is listening to this, have advanced and revolutionized the way that we live our lives. Many listening to this, for example, have lived through the rise of smart phones, 3d printing, massive advancements in lithium ion batteries, the Internet, robotics, and some have even lived through the introduction of cable TV, color television, and computers as an appliance. All advances in machinery, however, since the beginning of time have one thing in common: they make what we want to do easier. One of the great tragedies of being imperfect entities, however, is that we make mistakes. Sometimes those mistakes can lead to war, famine, blood feuds, miscalculation, the punishment of the innocent, and other terrible things. It has, thus, been the goal of many, for a very long time, to come up with a system for not making these mistakes in the first place: a thinking machine, which would help eliminate bias in situations. Such a fantastic machine is looking like it's becoming clo

  • P4: Go with the Flow (Conceptual Calculus: Related Rates of Change)

    P4: Go with the Flow (Conceptual Calculus: Related Rates of Change)

    10/03/2020 Duração: 38min

    Join Gabriel and Sofía as they delve into some introductory calculus concepts. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] Ways to support the show: -Visit our Sponsors:       theGreatCoursesPlus.com/breakingmath Get a free month of the Great Courses Plus while supporting this show by clicking the link and signing up!         brilliant.org/breakingmath Sign up at brilliant.org, where breaking math listeners get a 20% off of a year's subscription of Brilliant Premium! Patreon Become a monthly supporter at patreon.com/breakingmath Merchandise Purchase a Math Poster on Tensor Calculus at our facebook store at facebook.com/breakingmathpodcast --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • 47: Blast to the Past (Retrocausality)

    47: Blast to the Past (Retrocausality)

    29/02/2020 Duração: 31min

    Time is something that everyone has an idea of, but is hard to describe. Roughly, the arrow of time is the same as the arrow of causality. However, what happens when that is not the case? It is so often the case in our experience that this possibility brings not only scientific and mathematic, but ontological difficulties. So what is retrocausality? What are closed timelike curves? And how does this all relate to entanglement? This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA 4.0 license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • RR30: The Abyss (Part One Black Holes Rerun)

    RR30: The Abyss (Part One; Black Holes; Rerun)

    18/02/2020 Duração: 54min

    Sofia is still recovering from eye surgery, so this will be a rerun. We'll probably be back next week. The idea of something that is inescapable, at first glance, seems to violate our sense of freedom. This sense of freedom, for many, seems so intrinsic to our way of seeing the universe that it seems as though such an idea would only beget horror in the human mind. And black holes, being objects from which not even light can escape, for many do beget that same existential horror. But these objects are not exotic: they form regularly in our universe, and their role in the intricate web of existence that is our universe is as valid as the laws that result in our own humanity. So what are black holes? How can they have information? And how does this relate to the edge of the universe? [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • P3: Radiativeforcenado (Radiative Forcing)

    P3: Radiativeforcenado (Radiative Forcing)

    03/02/2020 Duração: 41min

    Learn more about radiative forcing, the environment, and how global temperature changes with atmospheric absorption with this Problem Episode about you walking your (perhaps fictional?) dog around a park.  This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

  • 46: Earth Irradiated (the Greenhouse Effect)

    46: Earth Irradiated (the Greenhouse Effect)

    20/01/2020 Duração: 43min

    Since time immemorial, blacksmiths have known that the hotter metal gets, the more it glows: it starts out red, then gets yellower, and then eventually white. In 1900, Max Planck discovered the relationship between an ideal object's radiation of light and its temperature. A hundred and twenty years later, we're using the consequences of this discovery for many things, including (indirectly) LED TVs, but perhaps one of the most dangerously neglected (or at least ignored) applications of this theory is in climate science. So what is the greenhouse effect? How does blackbody radiation help us design factories? And what are the problems with this model? This episode is distributed under a CC BY-SA license. For more information, visit CreativeCommons.org. [Featuring: Sofía Baca, Gabriel Hesch] --- This episode is sponsored by · Anchor: The easiest way to make a podcast. https://anchor.fm/app Support this podcast: https://anchor.fm/breakingmathpodcast/support

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